The Latest: Collins-McMurray race in NY too close to call

Rep. Chris Collins, R-N.Y poses for photographs with his wife Mary Sue Collins after speaking with the media Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2018, in New York. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)

NEW YORK (AP) — The Latest on New York’s election (all times local):
1:30 a.m.
The western New York congressional race between incumbent Republican Chris Collins and Democrat Nate McMurray was too close to call, but the challenger appeared to realize that only after initially conceding.
McMurray is now demanding a recount.
The Democrat addressed supporters shortly after 11 p.m., telling them the effort was “going to come up a little short.”
That prompted Collins to declare victory about a half hour later.
But with preliminary returns showing the narrowest of margins for Collins, McMurray issued a statement early Wednesday demanding a recount, saying “the will of the voters must be heard.”
Collins is seeking re-election to a fourth term while facing trial in 2020 on federal charges of insider trading. He has pleaded not guilty.
___
12:55 a.m.
Republican U.S. Rep. Peter King has defeated Democratic challenger Liuba Grechen Shirley, a first-time candidate who had hoped to ride a “blue wave” of opposition to President Donald Trump into office.
King’s victory Tuesday will return him to Congress for a 14th term. He is New York’s longest-serving Republican, representing parts of Long Island since 1993.
A hard-liner on issues like crime and immigration, King has campaigned on a reputation for bipartisanship on other issues, like supporting health programs for Sept. 11 rescue and recovery workers.
His campaign included television ads featuring support from a woman whose daughter was killed by members of the MS-13 street gang.
His opponent, Grechen Shirley, criticized King’s opposition to abortion rights and his support of Trump’s ban on travel from certain, mostly Muslim nations.
___
12:50 a.m.
A closely-watched Congressional battle in central New York is too close to call.
Republican U.S. Rep. Claudia Tenney and Democratic challenger Anthony Brindisi each had nearly half of the vote early Wednesday with some ballots yet to be counted.
Tenney was an early supporter of President Donald Trump and her rhetoric bothered some moderates within her own party. But her policies remained popular in a district strongly backed Trump in 2016.
A strong supporter of gun ownership rights, Tenney took criticism for saying in an interview that many people behind mass murders are Democrats.
Tenney also circulated a petition calling for Hillary Clinton’s imprisonment.
Brindisi, a state assemblyman, had campaigned on the need for bipartisanship in Washington. The district includes dairy farms and former manufacturing towns like Binghamton and Utica.
___
12:20 a.m.
Republican U.S. Rep. Tom Reed has defeated Democrat Tracy Mitrano in a district representing New York’s rural, economically stressed Southern Tier.
Reed’s victory Tuesday will send him to a fifth term in Congress.
During the campaign the 46-year-old Republican said his priorities were job creation, tax reform and gun rights.
His district bordering Pennsylvania favored President Donald Trump by 15 points in 2016. Trump endorsed Reed on Twitter.
Mitrano is a former Cornell University cybersecurity expert who hasn’t previously held elected office.
Reed blasted the 60-year-old as an “extreme Ithaca liberal” during the race.
Mitrano positioned herself as a centrist, but supported the liberal position of Medicare for all.
___
12:07 a.m.
Democrat Antonio Delgado has ousted freshman Republican U.S. Rep. John Faso in a swing district in New York’s Hudson Valley.
Delgado, who is black, won Tuesday despite Republican ads that called him as a “big-city liberal” and claimed he denigrated women, police and American values during a brief rap career years ago.
His supporters said Republicans went too far with racially-charged attacks in a district that is 90 percent white.
Delgado is a corporate lawyer and former Rhodes scholar who campaigned on universal access to Medicare, creating jobs and eliminating tax loopholes for the rich.
Faso joined Congress last year. He was previously a state assemblyman.
Democrats seeking to flip the House had targeted the sprawling district stretching from New York City’s northernmost suburbs to rural areas near Albany.
___
11:28 p.m.
Republican U.S. Rep. Elise Stefanik has been elected to a third term in the northernmost congressional district in New York state.
Stefanik defeated Democrat Tedra Cobb in a campaign focused on the economy and jobs, a strong military and gun rights.
New York’s 21st Congressional District stretches from Lake Champlain to Lake Ontario. Voters there favored President Donald Trump by a nearly 14-percent margin in 2016 after previously supporting Barack Obama.
Stefanik is 34. She was the youngest member of Congress when she won the seat in 2014. She won a second term in 2016 with 66 percent of the vote.
Cobb is 50. She is a former St. Lawrence County legislator who has worked as an AIDS educator, substitute teacher and founder of a health care nonprofit.
___
11:25 p.m.
Republican U.S. Rep. Lee Zeldin has defeated Democratic challenger Perry Gershon in a New York district that includes the eastern half of Long Island.
Zeldin voted against the Republican tax plan but has otherwise been seen as a loyal ally of President Donald Trump.
He campaigned for a third term in Congress on promises to get tough on immigrant gang members.
He also ridiculed his opponent as “Park Avenue Perry” because Gershon was raised in Manhattan and only recently began voting on Long Island.
Gershon was a first-time candidate for any public office. He has long owned a home in East Hampton but voted in New York City until 2017.
Gershon had criticized Zeldin for being too close to Trump.
Zeldin joined Congress in 2015.
___
11:20 p.m.
Democrat Joseph Morelle has defeated Republican doctor Jim Maxwell in the race to succeed the late U.S. Rep. Louise Slaughter.
Morelle is the majority leader of New York’s assembly. He will represent a district centered around Rochester.
Slaughter died in March at the age of 88. She had been in Congress since 1987.
Morelle said during the race that he wanted to pick up her mantle.
Morelle ran on his legislative experience and that as a former small business owner. He was elected to the Assembly in 1990 after six years in the Monroe County Legislature.
He won the Democratic nomination in a four-way primary and campaigned on issues including protecting Medicare, universal health care, job creation and gun control.
Maxwell is a neurosurgeon and was a newcomer to politics.
___
11:10 p.m.
Republican U.S. Rep. John Katko has won re-election to a third term in a central New York congressional district that voted Democratic in the last two presidential elections.
Katko defeated Democrat Dana Balter on Tuesday after a campaign in which he portrayed himself as a bipartisan voice in Washington.
He had an anti-gridlock message and blamed hard-right conservatives in his own party for keeping Congress from passing good legislation on health care and infrastructure.
In 2016, Katko was one of only 23 House Republicans who won in a district carried by Hillary Clinton.
Balter was an organizer in a Syracuse group formed to fight President Donald Trump’s agenda.
Her congressional bid focused on campaign finance reform and protecting and expanding Medicare, Medicaid and Social Security.
___
11:00 p.m.
Democrat Letitia James has defeated Republican lawyer Keith Wofford in New York’s attorney general race.
With her victory Tuesday, James becomes the first black woman elected to statewide office in New York.
The 60-year-old will also be the state’s first black attorney general.
James is in her second term as New York City’s public advocate, a post similar to an ombudsman.
The Democrat has vowed to use her powers to oppose policies of President Donald Trump.
Pending state suits challenge administration policies on immigration and the environment. Another accuses Trump’s charitable foundation of breaking the law.
James will take over from Attorney General Barbara Underwood, who was appointed in May after elected Attorney General Eric Schneiderman resigned following allegations he physically abused women.
Underwood wasn’t a candidate in the election.
___
10:05 p.m.
Democrat Max Rose has defeated U.S. Rep. Dan Donovan, unseating the only Republican member of New York City’s congressional delegation.
Rose is an Army veteran who was wounded in Afghanistan in 2013. He beat the odds in defeating Donovan in a district that covers Staten Island and a small part of Brooklyn.
New York’s 11th Congressional District was Trump Country in the last national election.
Unlike other Democratic candidates in liberal New York, Rose didn’t make President Donald Trump’s leadership a central issue of his campaign, campaigning instead on nonpartisan issues like fixing national infrastructure and fighting the opioid addiction epidemic.
Donovan was Staten Island’s district attorney before being elected to Congress in 2015 in a special election. He was re-elected for a full term in 2016.
___
9:45 p.m.
Democrat Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez has defeated a little-known Republican opponent in a district representing part of New York City.
Her victory Tuesday over economics professor Anthony Pappas was widely expected after Ocasio-Cortez scored an unanticipated upset over 10-term U.S. Rep. Joe Crowley in the Democratic primary in June.
At 29 years old, Ocasio-Cortez could become the youngest member of Congress.
She is one of a handful of Congressional candidates who identified as democratic socialists.
Ocasio-Cortez has promised to try and push the Democratic party further to the left.
She supports government-paid health care for all, a $15 minimum wage, free college tuition and the abolition of the federal department of Immigration and Customs Enforcement.
___
9:06 p.m.
Democrat Kirsten Gillibrand, of New York, has defeated Republican challenger Chele Farley to win re-election to the U.S. Senate.
Gillibrand was heavily favored in Tuesday’s election and has been talked about as a potential presidential candidate in 2020.
At a recent debate, Gillibrand pledged to serve her entire six-year Senate term.
Gillibrand was appointed in 2009 to the Senate seat vacated when Hillary Clinton was nominated secretary of state.
She rose to prominence in the #MeToo movement last year when she was the first Democratic senator to publicly call for fellow Democratic U.S. Sen. Al Franken to resign amid sexual misconduct allegations.
She has also focused on sexual assault in the military and on college campuses.
Farley works in the financial services industry. She’s never held elected office.
___
9:05 p.m.
New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo has won a third term by beating Republican Marc Molinaro.
The Democrat was seen from the start as the prohibitive favorite in the race, with big advantages in fundraising and name-recognition.
He worked throughout the campaign to link Molinaro to President Donald Trump, who is unpopular with many New Yorkers.
Cuomo also touted his administration’s work rebuilding airports and bridges and boosting the upstate economy.
The victory would give Cuomo the same number of terms as his father, the late Gov. Mario Cuomo.
Cuomo has been talked about as a potential 2020 presidential candidate but said he would serve out his entire term if re-elected.
Molinaro is the county executive in Dutchess County.
Cuomo is the 10th New York governor elected to a third term.
___
3:30 p.m.
New York City Council Speaker Corey Johnson is calling for the resignation of the city’s Board of Elections director amid reports of malfunctioning ballot scanning machines and hours-long lines at some polling stations.
Johnson said in a Tweet that “voting should not be this difficult.”
He called for the resignation of elections director Michael Ryan and “a full top to bottom review of what went wrong today.”
A Board of Elections spokeswoman didn’t immediately respond to inquiries.
Hard numbers on the extent of the city’s problems weren’t immediately available, but voters took to social media to complain about multiple locations where scanners were having trouble reading ballots or had stopped working entirely, leading to severe bottlenecks.
New York’s attorney general says by mid-afternoon it had received 225 complaints about voting problems.
___
11:30 a.m.
Rainy, windy weather in New York City and around the state hasn’t seemed to deter voters, with higher-than-usual turnout reported at some polling places.
Turnout was so heavy at one packed precinct on Manhattan’s Upper West Side that the line to scan ballots stretched around a junior high school gym on Tuesday morning.
Poll workers there told voters that two of the roughly half-dozen scanners were malfunctioning. Repairs were underway. Reports of broken scanners were surfacing at other New York City polling places as well.
Voters across the state are deciding on candidates for governor, senator, attorney general, state legislature and 27 seats in the U.S. House.
Gov. Andrew Cuomo is seeking a third term, and Republicans and Democrats are battling over the makeup of the state’s congressional delegation.
___
6:45 a.m.
New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo seeks a third term and Republicans and Democrats battle over the makeup of the state’s congressional delegation as the caustic election midterm election campaign reaches its climax.
Voters across the state will decide Tuesday on candidates for governor, senator, attorney general, state legislature and 27 seats in the U.S. House.
New York has more than 12 million registered voters. Democrats outnumber Republicans by more than 2 to 1.
Polls opened at 6 a.m. and close at 9 p.m. Unlike many other states where millions of votes have already been cast, New York doesn’t have early voting, though many have mailed in absentee ballots.
Some of the most watched races this year involve incumbent Republican members of congress fighting an unusual number of Democratic challengers.
___
12:15 a.m.
New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo seeks a third term and Republicans and Democrats battle over the makeup of the state’s congressional delegation as the caustic election midterm election campaign reaches its climax.
Voters across the state will decide Tuesday on candidates for governor, senator, attorney general, state legislature and 27 seats in the U.S. House.
New York has more than 12 million registered voters. Democrats outnumber Republicans by more than 2 to 1.
Polls open at 6 a.m. and close at 9 p.m. Unlike many other states where millions of votes have already been cast, New York doesn’t have early voting, though many have mailed in absentee ballots.
Some of the most watched races this year involve incumbent Republican members of congress fighting an unusual number of Democratic challengers.