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Right In Your ‘Vase’

July 28, 2013
By Terry Kovel , The Post-Journal

Ferock is a name that appears on art pottery but is not well known. In 2012 a vase marked "Ferock" was sold at a Humler & Nolan auction in Cincinnati for $2,760. The auction house and a few collectors knew who made it and how rare it is. Frank Ferrell (sometimes spelled Ferrel) worked in Zanesville, Ohio, in the early 1900s. He also worked for Weller (1897-1905), Roseville (1918-1954), J. B. Owens and Peters and Reed, all nearby Ohio potteries. He is best known for his work at Roseville designing pottery lines. The Ferock vase that just sold was made for the University of North Dakota from North Dakota clay. It was shown at the National Corn Exhibition in 1909. The Arts and Crafts style was interpreted with angular designs on one side and raised fold-like markings on the other. The 12-inch-high vase is covered with a matte, crazed, light beige glaze. It is pictured in two books about the University of North Dakota School of Mines pottery. The university's pottery opened in 1892 and its pieces were sold, but student work was not offered until 1909. It closed in 1949. Because the vase has such a complete history and was made by an important designer, it attracted the bids of serious collectors and brought a high price. Collectors today search for the less-publicized but well-designed pottery of the 1900-1950s era as well as later studio pottery. The best pieces of well-known art pottery like Rookwood and Weller can sell for more than $10,000 - too expensive for most collectors.

 
 

 

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