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NSA Officials: No Cause For Worry

July 8, 2013

Government officials’ reactions to revelations the privacy of millions of Americans has been invaded would be laughable were the situation not so seriou....

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(23)

patriot012

Jul-08-13 7:10 AM

bullchit, who in their right mind would trust our government with all the scandals and Chicago mob attitude of this admiration.???

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patriot012

Jul-08-13 7:19 AM

Our country is bankrupt ,yet they can build a billion 's of dollar N.S.A. building to spy on American's and the world??? Also with trillions of debt this prez and his family go on a one hundred million dollar vacation to Africa? not to mention all the other vacations this family takes ie; daughters to Mexico, wife to Hawaii prez to Florida to gulf with Woods. Sequester, right for the tax payers only and our military personnel, look at Niagara Fall Air Force base. major cuts

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DavidVA

Jul-08-13 9:25 AM

I'm surprised that anyone is shocked by any of this. NSA has been able to do this for decades. Frankly, limiting the data mining to material suitable for traffic analysis is enough to assure tha no one's actual converstaions are compromised. And if we said no, and a preventable terrorrist attack occurs, how will you feel then? Everything is a trade-off.

Yet, actual snooping is exactly the kind of thing we readily agree to allow private companies to do all the time. Remember those 5,000 word contracts to which you must agree or you aren't allowed to use Google, Yahoo or hundreds of other sites? They all require you to waive your right to privacy. Facebook can't exist any other way.

So be mad or not. The big offenders are private, and they all want some of your money.

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PleaseWakeUp

Jul-08-13 9:51 AM

The moment we get on the internet your privacy is lost. Your cell phones are using radio waves so your privacy is lost. Your Credit Card and Banking activities affect your privacy.

Get over it!

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PleaseWakeUp

Jul-08-13 9:53 AM

You want privacy? Get offline, Pay with cash and stop calling people. You and only you control your privacy. You want Privacy, stop posting comments!

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Emelye

Jul-08-13 3:09 PM

Ever since the OSS of WW 2 evolved into the CIA our secret government has grown and morphed into a huge, expensive and impossible to correctly oversee behemoth whose abuses are no surprise. Our 4th amendment rights are being curtailed daily in the name of anti-terrorism and the people's oversight is severely limited by this greedy wing of the military/industrial complex.

I doubt we can safely abolish the NSA, although I wish we could, so the only thing left is to increase oversight and develop more effective checks and balances against the unconstitutional power grabbing that this part of our military has become. We have to balance security and freedom. The NSA incident has shown the pendulum has swung too far at the expense of our civil rights.

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ironyoozesfromyouryap

Jul-08-13 3:20 PM

"bullchit, who in their right mind would trust our government with all the scandals and Chicago mob attitude of this admiration.???"

Patriot Act is 10 years old, stupid ***.

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ironyoozesfromyouryap

Jul-08-13 3:21 PM

Emelye - just read today that in 1940, we were the 18th largest standing army. Pretty funny to think about.

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FedUpL8ly

Jul-09-13 5:53 AM

patriot012, look at all the disagrees to your 7:19Am comment. Everything you said was true but you have the useful idiots who would go along with anything Obama and the Dems do. And then you have Emelye and her ilk who always manage to blame the military/industrial complex for everything. Politicians of both parties could cut the NSA budget but neither do it. The GSA has thousands of empty buildings but this administration is wastefully spending billions to construct a million-square foot complex in Utah. Obama wants this info as much as anyone or the program would be cut way back. And after the IRS abusing taxpayers who disagree with Obama policies to a much greater degree than Nixon ever did, and after the DOJ wiretapping the AP and Fox News journalists, I don't see how anyone could trust politicians to abuse the stored data. According to NSA whistleblowers from 2002, the data mining will have a much greater potential to abuse citizen rights than to prevent terror attacks.

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FedUpL8ly

Jul-09-13 5:55 AM

meant to say I don't know how anyone could trust politicians not to abuse the stored data.

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PleaseWakeUp

Jul-09-13 9:28 AM

Fed8, I am not saying this in support of Obama, but the system has been in place forever. It only went deeper after 2001.

I don't know how true the NCIS show is, but I am glad that they are able to research cellphone data and use gps to find any jerk that has been involved in a crime or national security.

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RationalThinker

Jul-09-13 12:29 PM

I really don't see how this is as gigantic of an issue as people make it out to be... you really don't think the government, with technology being what it is, hasn't been keeping an eye on the public for years now? And why shouldn't they? Honestly, what "right" of yours is being infringed upon by the NSA going through phone records? What are they going to find out? I know this sounds naive but if you're not doing anything wrong what do you have to worry about? I find it ludicrous how many people seem to think that our government is secretly striving for some sort of dystopian regime where they have ultimate power and the public has no rights or freedoms. Really? You want the authorities to prevent terrorism.. well.. this is the sort of 'infringement' that is necessary in order for that to happen. It is what it is people.

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Emelye

Jul-09-13 1:24 PM

For Rational_Thinker:

Amendment IV

The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.

Shifting from provable probable cause to looking for probable cause with fishing expeditions through mountains of citizen's personal data is a violation of the 4th amendment, in my opinion. The FISA courts are too lenient with the government agencies and have few, if any, checks and balances to reign in possible abuses. We need better mechanisms necessitated by the increased ability of our technology, to ride herd on those who would abuse their power.

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RationalThinker

Jul-09-13 1:33 PM

Yes, I knew I was asking for the ".. illegal searches and seizures" bit. Guess you got me on that one. Is it overreaching their bounds? Arguably. Is it the dark workings of a tyrannical government striving to weed out dissent and opposition to their diabolical machinations? I sincerely doubt that. But then again... I took the blue pill.

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RationalThinker

Jul-09-13 2:29 PM

So... judging by the "disagree" on my 1:33 comment it seems there really is someone who thinks the NSA info grab "Is it the dark workings of a tyrannical government striving to weed out dissent and opposition to their diabolical machinations". :/

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RationalThinker

Jul-09-13 3:09 PM

So the next time someone hijacks a plane and flies it into a skyscraper or shoots up a school or plants a bomb we can console ourselves by saying "well it sure is a tragedy but at least their constitutional rights weren't violated."

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FedUpL8ly

Jul-10-13 4:18 AM

Emelye, I've never refrained in showing when I disagree with you but I would like you to know that I don't disagree to be disagreeable. Your 1:24 PM comment sums it up perfectly. Thank you.

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RationalThinker

Jul-10-13 7:04 AM

I don't know which document has a bigger share of fanatics, the Bible or the Constitution.

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RationalThinker

Jul-10-13 1:49 PM

I have to admit however that the opinion piece by Sheldon Richman entitled "Motives Aside The NSA Should Not Spy On Us" is rather thought provoking indeed. The writer poses some very good points. I may have to reconsider my stance on the matter.

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RationalThinker

Jul-10-13 6:00 PM

Wow. It seems that I could say "The sky is blue" on a sunny day and I'd get a bunch of "disagrees".

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RationalThinker

Jul-11-13 7:02 AM

Lonerider: Am I to assume then that you were one of the one's who disagreed with my post stating that "I have to admit however that the opinion piece by Sheldon Richman entitled "Motives Aside The NSA Should Not Spy On Us" is rather thought provoking indeed. The writer poses some very good points. I may have to reconsider my stance on the matter."? So.. you're saying I *shouldn't* reconsider? I'm receiving mixed messages here. Bottom line is a big part of being rational is seeing things from many perspectives and not falling victim to knee jerk reactions. I'm willing to reconsider my opinions on matters. Quick, now smack that "disagree" button!

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RationalThinker

Jul-11-13 7:06 AM

And one instance in particular which has made me seriously reconsider just how 'harmless' these actions are.. just yesterday I saw news that Obama signed in some sort of act that allows him to 'cease control/shut down' ALL communications in the US in "time of emergency". WOW. That's actually quite scary. That's full on Machiavellian right there. I've been saying "ah it's no big deal" to all sorts of political maneuverings in the recent past but... this is simply ludicrous.

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RationalThinker

Jul-11-13 9:50 AM

“Assignment of National Security Emergency Preparedness Communications Function”. This is the act that allegedly grants the President the power to control nationwide communications. I gave it a brief perusal and I did not see anything that suggested such a power but then again I’m not fluent in political mumbo-jumbo. Anyone care to look into this and decipher it for the rest of us?

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