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My Special Needs Son

June 24, 2013

To The Reader’s Forum: My son on the autism spectrum is learnin....

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(22)

bobbojr

Jun-24-13 7:17 AM

NYSED Western Regional Special Education Office is in Batavia call 585-344-2002. They can help!

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JacksonC

Jun-24-13 8:05 AM

Kerri, Start with threatening to get a lawyer. PL 94-142 (federal law) guarantees your child appropriate education. The district will start listening when you start making threats. If not, follow through and make the call. Good luck!

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duckster

Jun-24-13 9:48 AM

that's right.. call out the lawyers... then the entire school system can be rearranged to accommodate your son

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southernman

Jun-24-13 11:19 AM

My prayers go out to you and your son. I also have a son that is like yours. Other folks mean well, but they simply do not understand. The educational system does NOT understand these kid's or how to handle them, and honestly, they seem to wish that you would just go away rather than learn to deal with the issue. For us, we did go away; we chose home schooling. It was simply not worth the fight to us, and thankfully, our son is doing very well. Best wishes to you, Kerri!

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50s4ever

Jun-24-13 2:49 PM

I thought they expanded this spectrum so greatly it covered even slight problems. Where did they fail?

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nonfiction

Jun-24-13 4:11 PM

Just because the child is "labeled" doesn't mean he's appropriately labeled. Yes the law states your home district has to provde each child with a free and appropriate education. I would talk to someone who has been through this and see what actions would fit you best.

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MTinNY

Jun-24-13 4:24 PM

Duckster...you can thank NYS for the need to involve lawyers in a child's education. They are the ones who have decided that the school system should to be providing therapy to children with special needs. Insurance companies won't pay for these services because its the schools' responsibility. The schools don't have the funds or the staff to do it and fight the parents tooth and nail. I know! I have a son who was diagnosed with severe autism. I fought for him for years for even the smallest of things before we pulled him out to homeschool. Trust me, parents doesn't want to involve lawyers, but they are given no other choice when they are trying to advocate for their child.

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MTinNY

Jun-24-13 4:32 PM

Southernman...I completely agree with you. After several years of fighting our school district, we grew tired of it and pulled all our child out to homeschool as well. We couldn't be happier! I don't miss the stress of IEP meetings one bit!

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carlaw

Jun-25-13 6:46 AM

This is a child, a person, not a disability. He has a unique mind and should be home schooled. This is a parents responsibility.

Read the life story of Temple Grandin. She is a Doctor of animal science at Colorado State University. She is autistic and a great role model. Stop seeing this child as a disability or he will become one.

The classroom isn't always the best placement for a child with Asperger's syndrome.

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Seadog

Jun-25-13 9:46 AM

Agree Carlaw. Sometimes trying to do the right thing is not the solution. When I was in school, there were special ed. classrooms. Then came along "mainstreaming". Unfortunately, mainstreaming takes away from the education of the other students without disabilities. Also, I have always wondered how a teacher with a k-6th grade degree is qualified to teach special needs children. Isn't that what a degree in special ed. is for?

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Seadog

Jun-25-13 1:15 PM

For the person that disagreed: Please tell me what I said that was incorrect.

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Seadog

Jun-25-13 2:50 PM

You're right Loneriderrr I see you got one too.

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bluesman

Jun-25-13 3:18 PM

Seadog-As for your 1:15 post. You have no doubt made some powerful enemies along the way. Careful when you start your car. As for 9:46, I agee with you agreeing with carlaw. If a special needs child let's say spits water on another child. And that child does what comes natural to a 6 or 7 year old and spits water back. He's called a bully for picking on a special needs child. It happened to us. It's a tough call. Everybody wants what's best for these children. But you can't hold the other kids to an impossible standard. Most teachers receive little training in how to handle these situations. My daughter is in her 4th year of education to be a teacher. So far, none.

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SCALLYWAG

Jun-25-13 3:20 PM

Mrs scallywag and I have a child with a cyst in his brain the size of a baseball. Been to several brain specialists to figure it out. Does this scare the crap out of a fella ? You bet it does. The doctors are amazed he can function on his right side. They figure his brain didn't completely develop as an infant and the cyst took its place. Growing up was a bit of a challenge socially for the lad. He had a few other issues not necessary to discuss. We never treated him differently cut him extra slack or used the words special needs even one time in our home. We never once expected to change to satisfy our situation. We took care of it the old fashioned way. We dealt with it ourselfs.

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SCALLYWAG

Jun-25-13 3:21 PM

Expected society........

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SCALLYWAG

Jun-25-13 3:27 PM

Today he's a top notch tool maker. Business owner. Scratch golfer. 230 average bowler. Hunter. Fisherman. Where's he find the time to work. ( I busted him on the golf coarse this morning) business phones forwarded to his cell. Not so special needs after all

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Hammond

Jun-26-13 2:00 AM

Good for him Scally! Glad to hear that. It seems like our society is doing things the opposite of the way you did it. And many of these kids never get past their disabilities because the school system just enables it rather than try to actually fix it.

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madman

Jun-26-13 7:53 AM

Mainstreaming special needs children has done more harm than good.

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askwhy

Jun-26-13 11:02 AM

Mainstreaming pulls the whole system down. It holds daily classroom progress back and leads to complete mediocrity in educational system. I have children that cover the spectrum. The high achievers are denied the advancement and the IEP students are grouped in with the "dunces" and marginalized off to the AIS group and given "academic crutches" that only enable their leaning disability however slight or manageable.

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50s4ever

Jun-26-13 4:34 PM

The cold hard fact is after spending double money to mainstream the kid, when they get out they will discover they are no longer mainstream.

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Jamestownite

Jun-26-13 11:14 PM

ur right there Hamstring. My "brother" from another mother had the same thing going on, but the school system failed him something terribly, saying he was retarded and too stupid to learn anything. They said he was too dumb to live on his own they said. The home school sent him to a school in Bradford...they did nothing better, except recommend he be placed in a group home for the rest of his days. The kid now lives here in NY without the aid of a group home. School never once considered what this guy wanted..or needed to succeed on their own.

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charlottencman

Jun-27-13 9:59 AM

A great teacher knows his/her students, recognizes their strengths and capabilities, but also works hard at overcoming obstacles for each individual student in his/her classroom. This is called differentiated instruction. As an effective teacher in a non-union state with high diversity and students who come from poverty, I have seen where giving all students equal opportunity to a great education through the "inclusion" model does work. My students' scores in standardized assessments grew significantly and the majority of my students met or exceeded expectations. I hope this child and other children with difficulties will be given the same opportunities as everyone else.

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